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Mortality and clinical outcomes in children treated with antiretroviral therapy in four African vertical programmes during the first decade of paediatric HIV care, 2001-2010

  • 2016/12/19
Type of publication
  • Articles
Authors
  • Ben-Farhat J
  • Schramm B
  • Nicolay N
  • Wanjala S
  • Szumilin E
  • Balkan S
  • Pujades-Rodriguez M
Themes
  • VIH
 
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
To assess mortality and clinical outcomes in children treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in four African vertical programmes between 2001 and 2010.
METHODS:
Cohort analysis of data from HIV-infected children (<15 years old) initiating ART in four sub-Saharan HIV programmes in Kenya, Uganda and Malawi, between December 2001 and December 2010. Rates of mortality, programme attrition and first-line clinico-immunological failure were calculated by age group (<2, 2-4 and 5-14 years), 1 or 2 years after ART initiation, and risk factors were examined.
RESULTS:
A total of 3949 children, 22.7% aged <2 years, 32.2% 2-4 years and 45.1% 5-14 years, were included. At ART initiation, 60.8% had clinical stage 3 or 4, and 46.5% severe immunosuppression. Overall mortality, attrition and 1-year failure rates were 5.1, 10.8 and 9.0 per 100 person-years, respectively. Immunosuppression, stage 3 or 4, and underweight were associated with increased rates of mortality, attrition and treatment failure. Adjusted estimates showed lower mortality hazard ratios (HR) among children aged 2-4 years (HR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.42-0.77 than children aged 5-14 years). One-year treatment failure incidence rate ratios (IRR) were similar regardless of age (IRR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.67-1.25 for <2 years; 1.01, 95% CI 0.83-1.23 for 2-4 years, vs. 5-14 years).
CONCLUSIONS:
Good treatment outcomes were achieved during the first decade of HIV paediatric care despite the late start of therapy. Encouraging early HIV infant diagnosis in and outside prevention of mother-to-child transmission programmes, and linkage to care services for early ART initiation, is needed to reduce mortality and delay treatment failure.